Motion


Dancing.

Mardi Gras Parades.

All about motion. Movement. Energy.

Often, it’s hard to show that. Motion is thought of being better portrayed on video. I don’t make videos. I do it using still cameras. I’ve done that since the days of film. For a time, I made my career on that.

The trick is to find something that’s recognizable and keep that somewhat sharp. Like a face. With a big smile. With laughing eyes.

I don’t do it as much because in the digital age, everybody thinks the picture should be sharp from front to back. That’s too bad. I find intentional motion blur to be one of the most interesting parts of a photograph. There’s many ways to do that. One, easy way, is to focus on something that doesn’t move, use a slow shutter speed and let things in motion pass through the picture.

That’s not what I did.

I allowed the subject’s natural motion meet my natural motion and create another kind of painterly motion to take place. Because the picture was made at night, all I did was stop down and let the shutter speed take care of itself.

As far as presenting pictures from Mardi Gras goes, I’m not going to try to show them in chronological order. Instead, I’m grouping them by photographic subject matter. I’ve been lucky to have made really good shoots. There is too much material to present the pictures by parade. Yesterday’s post of ten pictures was way too much. It was hard on me to do the prep work. It was hard on you to work your way through so many images. There is one blogger who posts a lot of pictures. He or she is proud of themselves when they write something like there are 42 pictures in this post. I usually just trash the blog. I don’t know about you, but 42 pictures is way too many to view. Especially, when it looks like the photographer stepped two steps to the left or right. Sheesh. Cull your work.

That’s not a rant. It’s a pro tip.

New Mardi Gras parades resume on Wednesday. You’ll probably see the work in a week. Heh!

8 Comments

  1. Hello Mr. Ray,
    As always, I have been enjoying your posts and insight. I found myself nodding vigorously when reading the section you mention about having too many photos on one post. I am relieved to see I’m not alone in feeling this way.
    Very happy that you’re enjoying Nat Geo Your Shot. As you say, it’s a different audience, but very supportive and honest with feedback. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. As, musician Eric Clapton said about one of his live songs after playing it back. “You’ll never again hear me playing that many notes in one space.” Photographs, like music, need to be able to breath. Ten was way too may. I mostly wanted to clear out one day of pictures.

      I find that I’m not getting that much feedback. After browsing around, I think it’s suffering from Instagramitis. Too much copying of what was once a successful picture.

      Liked by 1 person

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