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ne of the benefits of having software finding old files is that they are almost new to me, and certainly to you.

I made this picture on Memorial Day 2011 in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

No worries. To me this is just about the picture, nothing more.But I do want to tell you about what I think is a very cool tradition.

Yes. Memorial Day still means what it should mean to the rest of the country. We honor our war dead. The troops that gave their all. The ones who never came home.

But, New Mexicans do something different.

They bring a blanket and a picnic and they sit near the grave of their loved on and enjoy a meal with them. There are toasts and offerings and prayers.

There is one thing which makes New Mexicans like New Orleanians. As I walked around photographing — and you know me, I want people in my pictures — they would ask me to eat with them.

I think refusing a small bite would dishonor both the living and the dead. So, I ate with whoever I photographed. Besides, we got to know each other. And, they were able to enjoy a few pictures that I sent to them.

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his photograph was made with a Canon G 11. It was my picture a day camera. It was a great little camera. I wore it out. It did everything that I wanted it to do.

Many pixel peepers (folks that go too far in their technical evaluations) say that cameras like this one are not good for much more than just snapshots.

Does this picture look like a snapshot?

Besides, these days most clients want images for online projects. The few who want images for paper uses aren’t using them much bigger than a magazine cover. A camera with a good sensor and processor, no matter it’s classification, is just fine.

That’s the real world.


The cost of freedom.

“Daylight again. Following me to bed. I think about a hundred years ago.

How my fathers bled. I think I see a valley. Covered with bones in blue.

All the brave soldiers that cannot get older. Been asking after you.

Hear the past a calling. From Armageddon’s side.

When everyone’s talking and no one is listening. How can we decide?

Do we find the cost of freedom.  Buried in the ground?

Mother Earth will swallow you. Lay your body down. ” —  (Daylight Again & Find the Cost of Freedom) Stephen Stills

The Picture. Morning at the National Cemetery at Marietta, Georgia. It was established in 1866. It is closed to new burials — unless one has been previously scheduled — because it is full. The owner of the land, Henry Cole donated the land for use by both the Union and Confederate forces. That was not to be. Both sides declined. Eventually a compromise was reached. There are remains of 10,312 Union officers and soldiers interred here. And, the ones who came later. The Confederate Cemetery is about a half mile away. It was established in 1863. The remains of some 3,000 Confederate troops from across the southern states are buried, there.

The songs. Stephen Stills wrote “Find the Cost of Freedom” first. It became the ultimate concert closer. When Crosby, Stills and Nash (and sometimes Young), closed with this during their encore set, you knew the show was really at an end. They would sing the song and very softly say “goodnight.” Stills wrote “Daylight Again” well after “Find the Cost of Freedom” as sort of a prequel. The two songs eventually became one.