No. It’s not quite spring. In fact, according to the calender the first day of planting comes on 15 April, when people in Albuquerque believe there is no chance of a late season frost. It’s also income tax day, which means that there is plenty of chance of some other kind of frost.

However, even though much has been frozen and killed, some plants refuse to give up, like this little shoot growing through the snow. I suppose it says something about toughness or some kind of fighting spirit. I suppose the government wonks would use this to symbolize the so-called end of the recession when they talk about “little growing shoots.”
I think it’s just a nice transition picture.


While it would seem that New Mexico would be covered with cactus of all types, it generally isn’t so in the middle and northern parts of the state. Sure, there is cactus. But, it is not like you see in southern Arizona and parts of the California deserts. In fact, this example which I found near Our Lady of Guadalupe Church in the Greigo section of Albuquerque appears to have been planted next to the outdoor chapel. However, I do get requests for cactus from time to time, so I photographed it towards sunset.


I was walking to Old Town in Albu – querque, when I happened to look over a very low wooden slat fence. There I saw a version of the Zia symbol for sun that a weekend home builder had laid and painted into his brick work. I didn’t want to trespass on private property so I photographed it from the street which explains the sort of odd crop.

I’ve long said that when I claim to have a shooting block, the best thing for me to do is pick up a camera and walk out of my front door. I’ll find plenty of subject matter. I just have to open my eyes and see.
By the way, I posted a couple of days ago about switching from a picture a day project to a more thought out picture a week project. A friend of mine pointed out that I might not be clear on my intent. While the picture a day project is coming to an end — at least, for now — the daily blog continues on.


No. Most of the country has not broken out of winter’s icy grip. In fact, on Friday, the only state not to have some level of snowfall was Hawaii. Of course, some states are naturally frigid this time of year, like Alaska, especially around Wasilla. But, we find most of the Deep South cold and in New Orleans, Mardi Gras starts the day with bone chilling temperatures, but should warm up a bit as the day goes on. Of course, down there because of the humid air, 40 degrees feels like 35 degrees.


We seem to be heading into a slightly warmer and dryer week. It wasn’t so last week. Although the snow would melt by mid-day, we seemed to have a little snow every night. I suppose that in Albuquerque, we were lucky. In other parts of the state, the snow fell so fast and deep that interstates were closed, schools were closed, roads were closed and unplowed.

At any rate, this image was made at about 11 o’clock one night. It’s a little pop of a strobe that is reflecting off of the falling snow.


Today is an interesting day. Not only is it Valentine’s Day, but it’s the heaviest time during Carnival Season in New Orleans, and today is Chinese New Year. We begin the Year of the Tiger. This image only addresses New Orleans. It was made at St. Roch’s Cemetery and Chapel.

It was flooded during Hurricane Katrina. It has come back, but the neighborhood — also know as St. Roch — hasn’t yet.

The best story about the founding and the reason for being of the chapel is published on the Greater New Orleans website site. In part, it says:

“At the height of the yellow fever epidemic of 1867, a German priest named Rev. Peter Leonard Thevis arrived in New Orleans. Faced with the severity of the yellow fever epidemic, he turned to God invoking the intercession of St. Roch, the patron of good health. He promised that if no one in his parish should die from the fever, he would erect a chapel in honor of the Saint. Amazingly, not one member of Holy Trinity died from yellow fever, either in the epidemic of 1867 or 1878.

In thanks, Rev. Thevis’s conviction was to build not only a chapel as a shrine to St. Roch, but also a mortuary chapel in a last resting place for members of his flock. The cemetery was called the Campo Santo (resting place of the dead). Rev. Thevis traveled to Europe to study the architecture and construction of many beautiful shrines and chapels before building the chapel. The chapel, completed in 1876, was considered a beautiful example of Gothic architecture.

People came to the shrine in large numbers to ask St. Roch for help in cases of affliction, disease and deformities. At one time, the celebration of All Saints Day attracted thousands of people to the Shrine seeking guidance and help for themselves and others in distress. A small room on the side of the chapel holds a number of offerings left by visitors to the chapel. The tradition was to leave accouterments of the illness or disability (including, in the past, eyeballs, crutches, and false limbs!) in gratitude for recovery.

Another New Orleans tradition related to St Roch that took place for many years is that on Good Friday young girls made a pilgrimage to St. Roch’s chapel because of a local legend, which promised a husband before the year was out to the maiden who said a prayer and left a small sum at each of nine churches. It was considered doubly lucky if St. Roch’s chapel was the end of the pilgrimage.

The neighborhood got its current name in 1867 with the dedication of the St. Roch shrine and cemetery. St. Roch Chapel and Cemetery are a very important part of the history of the St. Roch neighborhood. At the height of the yellow fever epidemic of 1867, a German priest named Rev. Peter Leonard Thevis arrived in New Orleans. Faced with the severity of the yellow fever epidemic, he turned to God invoking the intercession of St. Roch, the patron of good health.


Today marks my two year anni – versary of shooting a picture a day. Today is also a heavy part of the Carnival Season, Valentine’s Day and Chinese New Year. In fact, my 2009-2010 PAD was tied to the Lunar Calender.

Going forward, PAD comes to an end, being replaced by PAW — picture a week. The picture will be a little more thoughtful, a little more researched and a little more fully worked. This is a departure from PAD because I was always chasing pictures whether they were good or not. And, when I thought I got what I needed I stopped shooting.
Wish me luck.


Since it’s Carnival Season in New Orleans and Mardi Gras is Tuesday, I thought I might post a few of my more – er – interesting images from my former home.

Here’s the story from the Greater New Orleans website. They tell it better then I could.

“At the height of the yellow fever epidemic of 1867, a German priest named Rev. Peter Leonard Thevis arrived in New Orleans. Faced with the severity of the yellow fever epidemic, he turned to God invoking the intercession of St. Roch, the patron of good health. He promised that if no one in his parish should die from the fever, he would erect a chapel in honor of the Saint. Amazingly, not one member of Holy Trinity died from yellow fever, either in the epidemic of 1867 or 1878.

In thanks, Rev. Thevis’s conviction was to build not only a chapel as a shrine to St. Roch, but also a mortuary chapel in a last resting place for members of his flock. The cemetery was called the Campo Santo (resting place of the dead). Rev. Thevis traveled to Europe to study the architecture and construction of many beautiful shrines and chapels before building the chapel. The chapel, completed in 1876, was considered a beautiful example of Gothic architecture.

People came to the shrine in large numbers to ask St. Roch for help in cases of affliction, disease and deformities. At one time, the celebration of All Saints Day attracted thousands of people to the Shrine seeking guidance and help for themselves and others in distress. A small room on the side of the chapel holds a number of offerings left by visitors to the chapel. The tradition was to leave accouterments of the illness or disability (including, in the past, eyeballs, crutches, and false limbs!) in gratitude for recovery.

Another New Orleans tradition related to St Roch that took place for many years is that on Good Friday young girls made a pilgrimage to St. Roch’s chapel because of a local legend, which promised a husband before the year was out to the maiden who said a prayer and left a small sum at each of nine churches. It was considered doubly lucky if St. Roch’s chapel was the end of the pilgrimage.

The neighborhood got its current name in 1867 with the dedication of the St. Roch shrine and cemetery. St. Roch Chapel and Cemetery are a very important part of the history of the St. Roch neighborhood. At the height of the yellow fever epidemic of 1867, a German priest named Rev. Peter Leonard Thevis arrived in New Orleans. Faced with the severity of the yellow fever epidemic, he turned to God invoking the intercession of St. Roch, the patron of good health.”


I decided that if I published an image that was any more simpler then yesterday’s blog, it would be nothing more then a line on a white screen. So, I switched to a New Mexican icon… a blue door. This image was made in Santa Fe as part of the doors, windows and details series for one of my agencies. It’s typical.