Well. The subject is the same as the last few days posts. Another picture of a county fair. Yes. Again. But, the post production is very different. I can’t even remember what I did to this picture. But, you have to admit that it’s not my usual style or color palette.


Art for Art’s Sake draws pretty good-sized crowds. They include just about everyone because it is a family event. It’s good fun. And, it’s not too art damaged. Heh! As I wrote yesterday, these things are a little hard to photograph. There is way too much sensory input. You either have to compartmentalize everything and focus on details. Or, I think, you have to let the pictures come to you and let the light fall where it may. This picture is an example of the latter. I was leaning against a light pole and just waiting for the crowd to move around. There is a second frame that I sort of like. But, it doesn’t have a happy feel to it. No amount of post production well help. Either you get it or you don’t.


Or. Something like that. This picture was made at night. The Garden District, especially at night, has a very spooky look and feel to it. You can just feel the ghostly presence. It should. And, you should. It is a very old area in a city that is very old in itself. Many of the old mansions are crumbling. Some are not. Before Anne Rice fled to San Diego, she lived in the Garden District. Now she wants to come back. She misses the ghosts. When they are in town, John Goodman and Sandra Bullock live within a few blocks of each other. They are spooky. Don’t you think?

Anyway.

This is an old carriage house. The mansion to which it belongs is huge. Given the state of the carriage house, I’m pretty sure this is one of those old mansions that is grand in name only. In New Orleans, and I suppose in plenty of other cities, once-monied families hold onto to their family property even though they no longer have the money to maintain it properly. I know it happens with more blue-collar families, since there are over 65,000 abandoned and blighted homes in the city  But. That’s a whole other story.

So.

At night. Hand held — not a great idea. But, sort of accidental. Post production done to bring the brightly-colored image back into something that speaks to the real scene. Run down. Eerie. Decrepit. 


When it rains around here, we often get some very pretty light as the clouds break and the sun peaks through the remaining clouds. Yes. The light is pretty. But, not as pretty as it is in — oh, say — New Mexico. But, that’s a whole other story. A better story is this one. Although I very rarely get lost, I completely misplaced my favorite street in New Orleans. Yeah. I know. Probably early onset something or other. But, this is amazing. Even to me. There is an old section of New Orleans that was once a heavy warehouse district. But, not THE warehouse district. For the most part, it stands alone and forgotten. One of the streets is still paved in cobblestones. The buildings on either side of it are made of brick. For the longest time, I was convinced that the cobblestones had been torn out and replaced by concrete. Well. That didn’t happen. The street moved. Well. That didn’t happen either. I just completely missed my mark. The cobblestone street is still there. The only thing that has changed is that someone either lives or works in a building I thought was abandoned and the brick building on the other side of the street is being restored. Slowly.

Anyway. Here’s the picture. It’s pretty much f8 and be there. Very little post production. I didn’t need to do that. Nature did that.


Ah yes. One night in The French Quarter.One night on Bourbon Street. Bourbon Street. The street where music never stops. The girls always beckon. If you pay for them. The place where beer and alcohol flows like water. It smells like it. The place where a lot of people show their true selves. It is probably my least favorite street in The Quarter. But, I go there. Sometimes. Looking for pictures. Like this one. Not much to it. See the picture. Point the camera. Press the button. Shoot. 


A little while back, I took a ride into the country outside of New Orleans. Depending on which way you drive, you can be in swamplands, gulf coast scenery or even what I tend to think of as just “The South.” “The South” is where I went. I traveled downriver towards Delacroix. Even though it’s less than 30 minutes from New Orleans, scenes like the one in my picture are what you find. Yeah. I gilded the lily a little bit by going on a day when the sky had some character.


Yesterday, I wrote a little about Freret Street and its relationship to Central City. I thought I’d give you all a quick look at the street and some of the things that you can see there. It’s an overview and I’m sure I’ve missed something that somebody might think is important, but these kinds of shoots are always a work in progress.


I usually think of places like this as being sort of country. Not this time.  It’s Urban. Very urban. This store is located in the heart of Central City. It’s stands completely alone on sort of a five-pointed  corner. You cannot miss it. I guess they must sell food other than chicken since a close look at the picture reveals a sign that says they sell spare ribs. And, ice cream cones and Catfish.

Technically speaking, I see a lot of my Central City pictures as being down and dirty, very gritty and a little grungy. So, I use Snapseed to help me get them looking that way. Sometimes, I think, it’s a little overkill. But, it helps drive the point home. 


This is the last of my post-Hurricane Isaac pictures. It was made downriver in Holy Cross, which as a may have mentioned, is a sub-district of the 9th ward. Seen from this angle, the post-storm clouds don’t look quite so menacing. Again, all post production was done on my i-Pad using Snapseed. I think that phase is getting too easy. It confuses people.