Color, Laskowitzpictures.com, Photographs, Photography, Pictures, Ray Laskowitz
Comments 8

Far From Home


St. Joseph’s Cemetery.

Cemeteries. A lot of people like to photograph them. I’m one of them. I’m not sure why. Maybe it’s because I like to use them as a base photograph for something else. After all, where can you find a place that’s sacred, moody, mysterious and spooky? All in one? You just have to work at the right time of day.

Like anything photographic, I think that you just want to feel, and not think about the subject too much while you are making the pictures.

But, but, but…

I also believe that you have to make a loose plan that outlines your goals. Often times, I just sort of stumble onto pictures. That’s not always an effective way of working. If you are seeing well, you can make a bunch of good pictures in about a half hour. Or, you might spend all day looking, but not seeing. The result is predictable. No pictures. A tank of gas wasted. Time wasted.

My preferred way of working is by assignment, or self assignment. That doesn’t mean that every picture has to be planned. In fact, it shouldn’t mean that.

It should mean that you’ve picked a location based on your interest. Or, a subject that you enjoy exploring.  It might mean that you’ve done a bit of research. You might know the area’s history. You might have talked to people who spend a lot of time at your soon-to-be-photographed location. And, who might understand the subject better than you do. They might even become part of your picture story.

From the  technical side, you might have planned for the light and shadows. You know, the time of day in which natural light helps make the picture better. You might bring allied equipment like strobes and reflectors.  If you want maximum sharpness and depth of field you might also bring a tripod.

Depending on your planned location, you might also bring other people. Maybe just a friend to watch your back. Maybe an assistant who understands photography and can make your life easier. And, maybe a fixer who takes care of everything needed to allow you to be in the place you want to work. This person, understands your photographic needs, speaks the local language and English and can deal with the proper paperwork.

Please don’t misunderstand. On most self-assignments, I’m just exploring. The only extra person I might bring is the one who watches my back. The other two assistants that I mentioned are really for a paid assignment work.

The one thing you don’t want is a map of tripod holes. That’s a joke. You know, that’s when you try to find the exact place where a great photograph was made so that you can copy it. Make your own pictures. Always.

This picture. I made it a few weeks ago on St. Joseph’s Night when the Mardi Gras Indians rolled through the streets of New Orleans. Even though I knew the kinds of pictures I hoped to make, I also knew from experience that if I parked my car on the street that divides the two sides of the cemetery I might get lucky and make a couple of unrelated, but good pictures.

I did make a few pictures worth looking at more than once.

This ought to help you understand the notion of “photographer’s luck,” which is really a mix of experience, talent and situational awareness.  It paid off nicely. I made the “sunset, crosses and telephone poles” picture that many of you liked. I made this picture, along with another that I haven’t shown you yet. Unlike the first picture, this one took a lot of work in post production to make it look like my vision. The vision in my head.

That’s my story. I’m sticking to it. I’ll answer questions though. I’ll always answer questions.

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8 Comments

  1. Interesting post, Ray! And, as always, the picture is awesome! It reminds me of the Sunday morning walks that my Dad and I would take when I was a kid. We had several large cemeteries near where we lived in London and he would point out the memorials and gravestones of famous people who were buried there. Ever since then, I’ve always found these old cemeteries fascinating.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you. If I’m on a road trip, I stop a little country cemeteries. One of these days I’m going to figure out how to make the kind of picture that shows the location and the graves properly.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I also love cemeteries and have always made stops along travel routes to at least explore for a little while. I love what you did with this photo. You really do inspire me to be a bit more experimental. Thank you.

    Like

  3. Bit like you there – every holiday I end up taking photos of cemeteries. From country to country death and how dealt with is so different, from ornate marble and expensive marble tombs in Poland, to the stacked tombs in Italy and in France the little village cemeteries with their “greenhouse” style tombs where on Saints Days family visit and leave “souvenirs”. They are lovely quiet places to spend an hour or two and I am totally not morbid nor disrespectful. I read the graves, I have a think about life. There is also a sense of history when you see many graves with the same family names – the whole village together still. And in the cities you have the graves of the famous and the infamous. Well worth a visit to track down your heroes and heroin’s,

    Liked by 1 person

    • I used to be more that way. I live in a giant cemetery. After all, New Orleans is old by US standards and people are buried everywhere. Even our famous French Quarter is built upon one of the earliest cemeteries in Louisiana.

      My people leave something behind to say that someone was there. There is a national cemetery in Chalmette about twenty yards from where The Battle of New Orleans was fought. I generally leave something at one particular gravesite. For a time, the person buried there served with me in another far of corner of the world. His marker represents what I couldn’t do, once.

      Like

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