Chicago Cub fans.
Chicago Cub fans.

In the baseball world, The Chicago Cubs won the National League pennant last night. They will play in the World Series. For the first time since 1945. They will play the Cleveland Indians, who last appeared in the World Series in 1948. A long time for both teams.

But.

The last time the Chicago Cubs won the World Series was in 1908. An even longer time. Think about it. They last won the biggest prize in baseball before all of us were born. Before our grandparents were born. Before our parents were born. Before WWI. Before WWII. The Middle East was known as Arabia. There were 46 states in The United States. Many of the countries where you live were colonies. There was no passenger plane travel. No internet. No smartphones. Sheesh, there was barely electricity and a hardwired telephone system that was consistently usable.

A lot has happened in 108 years.

My apologies to those of you who live in other places. To those of you who don’t know what baseball is, or even care. Please just enjoy the picture.

For me this World Series is about history as much as anything. Yes. I’m a baseball fan. But, I’m a New York Yankees fan. City of my birth and all of that. My number two team is the Los Angeles Dodgers. The team in the city where I grew up. They lost last night to the Cubs.

I don’t really say this very often. But, I read a lot of history. That matters to me. Especially in this political and digital age of lies. I hope to learn some truth.

The picture. No. I was not in Chicago last night. I took it the last time the Cubs went to the playoffs. In 2003. The cheer back then was “Fry the Fish,” because they were playing the Miami Marlins. The Cubs lost the game and the series while I was there. I only happened to be in Chicago because I was shooting a location book project on the city. I spent a couple of weeks there. I photographed the usual. I explored the neighborhoods. I hung out a lot in the Polish neighborhood. I ate my kind of soul food. When the Cubs came home to play, I went to Wrigley Field. I didn’t have a ticket.  I just photographed the edges. My publisher was happy that my photographer’s luck kicked in. That I was even there at the right time.

Thirteen years is also a long time. The picture was made on film. Fuji Velvia pulled 1/3 of a stop. That meant I was shooting at about ISO 32. Think about that. Today, if we are working in low light and have a camera with a good sensor and processor, we might start at ISO 800. We might go as far as ISO 5,000 on some cameras. More on some of the latest cameras. This picture has what I call motion wobble. Not really unsharp. But, not as sharp as it could be.

Doesn’t matter. It catches the emotion, the feeling and sense of the time.