Laskowitzpictures.com, Photographs, Pictures, Ray Laskowitz
Comments 10

Southern Feel.


Southern Trees and Spanish Moss

Southern Trees and Spanish Moss

The South.

It has a look. A feel. A smell. All its own.

In the summer it’s hot. Sticky. Humid. Wet.

And, summer lasts a while. From March to Christmas.

In the winter, it cools off a bit. But, the humidity doesn’t go away. The wetness doesn’t go away. It manifests itself in fog. 40 degrees feels like 20 degrees elsewhere. It’s bone chilling.

If you’re from the south, all of that feels like home. If you’ve migrated here — like me — you probably can’t stand some of it. I’ve been living somewhere in the south, with the exception of my southwestern break taken for Hurricane Katrina, for 23 years. Longer if you count my time in Virginia and North Carolina. I’m still not used to it.

Yet. Still I stay. I’m not to sure why. Obviously, I like the pictures. Is that a good enough reason?

Vietnam Vets say that when they return to Vietnam to make peace with whatever they need to make peace with, the first thing that happens when they get off the plane is that they are hit with the heat, humidity and smell. Guess what? When I travel and return, that’s the same thing that happens to me, here. And, this ain’t Saigon. Oops. Ho Chi Minh City. This is New Orleans. At least they get to go home. I live here.

Happy weekend, y’all.

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10 Comments

  1. Hi Ray 🙂
    I’m not from the South, but I work in TN and GA once/week and absolutely love the people I meet and work with.
    Just yesterday, I started reading Hold Still by Sally Mann….I love learning about your neck of the woods via your lens.
    Gorgeous!
    Michelle

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    • Thank you, Michelle. I haven’t seen Ms. Mann’s book. I hope that she discusses how to be as a photographer. So many new photographers don’t understand that. These days, it seems like everybody is looking for short cuts and tips to being good right now.

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      • I’m completely fascinated by her techniques in the dark room. I haven’t been in a dark room since high school! Reading her book makes me realize how very little I do know about the technical side of photography. I rely on early morning (and evening) light and lots of luck. Like you, she has real skills and it adds so many layers to what might have been a regular picture had somebody else taken it.
        Her words are as poetic as her photos. Like you 🙂

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      • This is weird. I have to reply above your comment. She and I started out the same way, I think. Many years of darkroom work. I did some other work — managing big commercial presses to get the best out of a photograph — which helped me to learn even more about processing. I don’t believe that she does much digitally, as I do. But, I’m in the process of buying some older traditional SLR gear and another darkroom.

        That said, most photography is luck. Do you think that she can control her family for as long as it takes to make a large format image. Even waiting for the right light is, well, luck. You can only go so far… 🙂

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  2. I’m from Georgia. My nephew lives near New Orleans. I would had guessed Florida with the Spanish Moss or Savannah, GA perhaps. So pretty – thanks for sharing the photo. 🙂

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