Yellow


Yellow House
Big Yellow House

In New Orleans we like color. I love color. You know that. This is a bit much. I was tooling around one day in Lower Ninth Ward, on the river side. This part of the area was not completely destroyed by Hurricane Katrina and the breach of the levees as it was across Claiborne Avenue on what we would call the lake side. Buildings and houses were flooded here by very deep water. But, they weren’t ripped off their foundations. The weren’t broken in two. And, they weren’t torn apart.

However, it did take the residents a long time to either remediate and rebuild their property, or sell their damage houses.

When people finally did get moving on their houses, strange things started happening. Since many people were not insured for replacement value of their homes, they had to work with what money they managed to cobble together. The rebuilt cheaply and they bought what they could at discount prices. At a time when there were no discount prices. Often you see it in the exteriors of the buildings. Bright paint. It’s not so fashionable, so it doesn’t cost as much as more trendy colors. And, check it out. This yellow house, which at one time may have been a grocery store, bakery or some other local shop, is not the only bright building in the picture. Right next door on our left is a bright blue house. Look in the background to the right. Red houses. It looks like this neighborhood got a special deal on primary colored paint. It doesn’t really matter. These folks rebuilt and moved back home. They are tough people. Very tough people.

The picture. It just had to find the house and make the picture. And, expose it properly to bring out the saturation.

2 Comments

  1. I may have mislead you a little. Painting the the whole house one color as I described is sort of a make shift repair. But, brightly painted houses are more-or-less a New Orleans historical requirement in some neighborhoods. Many people, myself included, paint their homes to be historically accurate to the era in which it was built. For instance, when we lived on Esplanade Ridge, we owned a house that was built in 1834 and renovated in 1888. The back end was a Creole four room house. The front looked like a Victorian era house. We painted it a light salmon, trimmed with white, brown and gold. It certainly didn’t look like that yellow house. The colors aren’t universal. In some neighborhoods the houses were built in the 1920s. Proper paint was white with dark green trim.

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